Biobank Resources

biobank resources

"We know that researchers should have quick access to samples.  We believe this is critical in changing healthcare and bringing about better patient care, and we recognize that valuable samples are being lost due to the issue of financial sustainability."

- Marshall Schreeder
CEO, Conversant Bio

 

Helpful Publications

Here are a some resources to get started with on the issues of biobanking financial sustainability as well as a few case studies.  For a free 30-day all access pass to several publications highlighting sustainability, email us at biobanking@conversantbio.com.

Albert, Monique, John Bartlett, Randal N. Johnston, Brent Schacter, and Peter Watson.  Biobank Bootstrapping: Is Biobank Sustainability Possible Through Cost Recovery?  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25496148

Abstract 

The pre-eminent goal of biobanks is to accelerate scientific discovery and support improvements in healthcare through the supply of high quality biospecimens to enable excellent science. Despite the need for retrospective future-proofed cancer repositories, they are presented with significant fiscal challenges. While it was once thought that biobanks could recover most, if not all, operational costs through distribution fees, biobanks have been consistently unable to fully realize this dream.
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Bjugn, Roger and Bettina Casati.  Stakeholder Analysis: A Useful Tool for Biobank Planning.  http://www.redbiobancos.es/Pages%5CDocs%5CStakeholder_analysis_a_useful_tool_for_biobank_planning.pdf

Abstract

Stakeholders are individuals, groups, or organizations that are affected by or can affect a particular action undertaken by others. Biobanks relate to a number of donors, researchers, research institutions, regulatory bodies, funders, and others. These stakeholders can potentially have a strong influence upon the organization and operation of a biobank. A sound strategy for stakeholder engagement is considered essential in project management and organization theory. In this article, we review relevant stakeholder theory and demonstrate how a stakeholder analysis was undertaken in the early stage of a planned research biobank at a public hospital in Norway. 


Carpenter, Jane E.,  and Christine L Clarke.  Biobanking Sustainability—Experiences of the Australian Breast Cancer Tissue Bank (ABCTB).  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25496151

Abstract

Sustainability of biorepositories is a key issue globally. This article is a description of the different strategies and mechanisms used by the Australian Breast Cancer Tissue Bank (ABCTB) in developing and operating the resource since its inception in 2005. ABCTB operates according to a hub and spoke model, with a central management hub that is responsible for overall management of the resource including financial, ethical, and legal processes, researcher applications for material, clinical follow-up, information/database activities, and security.

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Henderson, Gail E., R Jean Cadigan, Teresa P Edwards, Ian Conlon, Anders G Nelson,James P Evans, Arlene M Davis, Catherine Zimmer and Bryan J Weiner. Characterizing biobank organizations in the U.S.: results from a national survey. http://genomemedicine.com/content/5/1/3 

Abstract 

Effective translational biomedical research hinges on the operation of 'biobanks,' repositories that assemble, store, and manage collections of human specimens and related data. Some are established intentionally to address particular research needs; many, however, have arisen opportunistically, in a variety of settings and with a variety of expectations regarding their functions and longevity. Despite their rising prominence, little is known about how biobanks are organized and function beyond simple classification systems (government, academia, industry).

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McDonald, Sandra A., Kara Sommerkamp, Maureen Egan-Palmer, Karen Kharasch, and Victoria Holtschlag.  Fee-For-Service as a Business Model of Growing Importance: The Academic Biobank Experience.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23386922

Abstract

Biorepositories offer tremendous scientific value to a wide variety of customer groups (academic, commercial, industrial) in their ability to deliver a centralized, standardized service model, encompassing both biospecimen storage and related laboratory services. Generally, the scientific expertise and economies of scale that are offered in centralized, properly resourced research biobanks has yielded value that has been well-recognized by universities, pharmaceutical companies, and other sponsoring institutions. 

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Simeon-Dubach, Daniel and Peter Watson.  Biobanking 3.0: Evidence based and customer focused biobanking.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0009912013006036

Abstract

Biobanking is a new and very dynamic field. To achieve long term financial sustainability of biobank infrastructures we propose that a new focus is needed on activities, products and services provided by the biobank that relate to the external stakeholder: biobanking 3.0. Earlier stages of biobanking are biobanking 1.0 (primary focus on the number of biospecimens and data) and biobanking 2.0 (primary focus on the quality of biospecimens and data). Both stages 1.0 and 2.0 are predominantly product oriented areas and have required a mostly internal focus on operational development within the biobank itself.

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Parry-Jones, Alison.  Assessing the Financial, Operational, and Social Sustainability of a Biobank: The Wales Cancer Bank Case Study.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25496149

Abstract

Biobank sustainability is a multi-faceted concept that many biobanks are wrestling with to justify their continued existence. After 10 years of operation, the Wales Cancer Bank is faced with a potential reduction in grant funding that will result in the need for a restructured approach to patient consenting, sample collection, and sample issue. A review is currently in progress, using evidence from the last 12 months, to inform the decisions that will be taken at the end of 2014 regarding the biobank's future. 

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Vaught, Jimmie, Joyce Rogers, Todd Carolin and Carolyn Compton. Biobankonomics: Developing a Sustainable Business Model Approach for the Formation of a Human Tissue Biobank.  http://jncimono.oxfordjournals.org/content/2011/42/24.long

Abstract

The preservation of high-quality biospecimens and associated data for research purposes is being performed in variety of academic, government, and industrial settings. Often these are multimillion dollar operations, yet despite these sizable investments, the economics of biobanking initiatives is not well understood. Fundamental business principles must be applied to the development and operation of such resources to ensure their long-term sustainability and maximize their impact.

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Verlinden,  Michiel , Herman Nys, Nadine Ectors, and Isabelle Huys.  Access to Biobanks: Harmonization Across Biobank Initiatives.  http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/bio.2014.0034

Abstract

The current study investigates whether access arrangements relevant for biobanking contain clear information on key access conditions. It furthermore assesses the extent to which these access conditions are harmonized across biobank initiatives.

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Warth, Rainer and Aurel Perren.  Construction of a Business Model to Assure Financial Sustainability of Biobanks.  http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/bio.2014.0057?journalCode=bio

Abstract

Biobank-suisse (BBS) is a collaborative network of biobanks in Switzerland. Since 2005, the network has worked with biobank managers towards a Swiss biobanking platform that harmonizes structures and procedures. The work with biobank managers has shown that long-term, sustainable financing is difficult to obtain. In this report, three typical biobank business models are identified and their characteristics analyzed. Five forces analysis was used to understand the competitive environment of biobanks. 

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